Released Nov 7, 1915, "But that was just a starter. His first picture, The Lamb, showed Fairbanks at his most active best, and it went over with a terrific bang." ~ Ralph Hancock and Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" Released Nov 21, 1915 According to IMDB Douglas Fairbanks has a small, uncredited role as a Texas soldier. This DW Griffith production was released just months after his highly-successful “Birth of A Nation” and attempted to tap into the same patriotic fervor that had made Nation such a great success. Released Oct 31, 1915. "In "Double Trouble" [Douglas] just doubled the thrills." ~ Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" "In "His Picture in the Papers," he had to run an automobile over a cliff, engage in a six-round bout with a professional boxer, jump off an ocean liner and swim to the distant shore, mix in a brawl with half a dozen gunmen, and leap twice from swiftly moving trains." ~ Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" "Alexandre Dumas' "The Three Musketeers" had been in the back of [Doug's] mind ever since he could remember. He once admitted that his ideal had always been D'Artagnan, the fourth musketeer, and that character had not only influenced every picture he had made but Doug had consciously or subconsciously lived the role all his life." ~ Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" The Thief of Bagdad is "an entracing picture, wholesome and beautiful, deliberate but compelling, a feat of motion picture art which has never been equalled." ~ New York Times

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Released Nov 7, 1915, "But that was just a starter. His first picture, The Lamb, showed Fairbanks at his most active best, and it went over with a terrific bang." ~ Ralph Hancock and Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer"

The Lamb (1915)

Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks set the stage for Douglas’ entrance into Hollywood in 1915, when he arrives to film his first motion picture, The Lamb: [Director DW] Griffith was engrossed with the apparently limitless range of the motion picture camera. Its power to “delay the tempo of conventional acting and to focus casual facial […]

Explore an imaginitive & original children's fairy tale from Doug's niece, Letitia Fairbanks

Released Nov 7, 1915, "But that was just a starter. His first picture, The Lamb, showed Fairbanks at his most active best, and it went over with a terrific bang." ~ Ralph Hancock and Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" Released Nov 21, 1915 According to IMDB Douglas Fairbanks has a small, uncredited role as a Texas soldier. This DW Griffith production was released just months after his highly-successful “Birth of A Nation” and attempted to tap into the same patriotic fervor that had made Nation such a great success. Released Oct 31, 1915. "In "Double Trouble" [Douglas] just doubled the thrills." ~ Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" "In "His Picture in the Papers," he had to run an automobile over a cliff, engage in a six-round bout with a professional boxer, jump off an ocean liner and swim to the distant shore, mix in a brawl with half a dozen gunmen, and leap twice from swiftly moving trains." ~ Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" "Alexandre Dumas' "The Three Musketeers" had been in the back of [Doug's] mind ever since he could remember. He once admitted that his ideal had always been D'Artagnan, the fourth musketeer, and that character had not only influenced every picture he had made but Doug had consciously or subconsciously lived the role all his life." ~ Ralph Hancock & Letitia Fairbanks from their 1953 bio "Douglas Fairbanks: The Fourth Musketeer" The Thief of Bagdad is "an entracing picture, wholesome and beautiful, deliberate but compelling, a feat of motion picture art which has never been equalled." ~ New York Times